Category Archives: body

Yoga Alliance Approved, My Ass

I was shocked to notice that they advertised their yoga teacher training programs as “Yoga Alliance Approved.” Misrepresentations like this are the dirty little secret of the yoga industry. No one really wants to admit there is no accreditation for Yoga…What no one ever seems to acknowledge or mention is that the YA provides no oversight whatsoever. No one checks to see if anyone is actually doing what they say. Everyone is on the “honor” system. Consequently, the registry amounts to a digital rubber stamp or paid advertising. Not to mention, the YA does not disclose what they do with the money they collect from the Yoga community.  read full article

-J. Brown

 

Some other percentage of the student base is unaware of the ruse. They mistakenly believe that a YA certification creates a minimum standard of competency on which they can rely. In other words, they may think they are eating Certified Organic peaches when, in fact, they are not.       continue

-Kerry Wills

 

Independent Yoga Educators of America

Kumare changed my life

Sri Kumaré is a revered Yoga Master, often known to his contemporaries as Adarsha or “The Mirror.” He is the current torchbearer of the Kumaré lineage and a respected, charismatic teacher of Yogic Science. Sri Kumaré is known for his youthful energy, transformative philosophy, and divine blessing.

But Kumaré is not real. He is an American filmmaker named Vikram Gandhi, who has transformed himself into Kumaré as the centerpiece of a social experiment designed to explore and test one of the world’s most sacred taboos. Concealing his true identity from all he meets, Kumaré forges profound, spiritual connections with real people from all walks of life. At the same time, in the absurdity of living as an entirely different person, Vikram the filmmaker is forced to confront difficult questions about his own identity. At the height of his popularity he reveals his greatest teaching: his true self. A playful yet genuine and insightful look at belief and spirituality, the film crosses a line few have dared to cross, all to discover: from illusion comes truth.

 

How to be a yoga blogger (just fill in the blanks)

Friday, May 26, 2006 via Leaping Lanka

Dear Ashtanga Yoga Blogger,

Thank you for subscribing to Ashtanga Yoga BlogBot™!

We’re the automated ashtanga yoga blog creation service that makes it a snap to generate those exhausting blog entries, leaving you with more valuable free time to do your yoga practice, think about your yoga practice, talk about your yoga practice, and obsess about those difficult asanas.

We ask you a few simple questions to determine your blog’s overall content, tone, and look, and then we feed your answers to our Blog-O-Matic™ supercomputer, which generates candid, interesting, and utterly unique blog entries that are specifically tailored to you!

 

 

 

3. It was so _____ at the yoga studio this morning!
1. nipple-hardeningly cold
2. heat-rash inducingly hot

4. My body felt so _____.
1. stiff
2. open
3. sore
4. achey
5. strong
6. weak

5. The _____ practicing next to me was so _____.

Noun
1. guy
2. girl

Adjective
1. stiff
2. flexible
3. bendy
4. floaty

6. Their _____ looked very _____.

Asana name
1. jump-backs
2. janu sirsasana C
3. marichyasana D
4. supta kurmasana

Adjective
1. floaty
2. bendy
3. stiff

7. I did _____ and it was so _____.

Asana name
1. jump-backs
2. janu sirsasana C
3. marichyasana D
4. supta kurmasana

Adjective
1. floaty
2. bendy
3. stiff

Continue reading at Leaping Lanka

The Men Who Stop Traffic

Oct 22, 2011 via The National by Helena Frith Powell

Parashu ML, left, and Stanly KV started rescuing victims of trafficking more than 20 years ago.
Sitting across a table from these two softly-spoken, unassuming middle-aged men it’s hard to imagine them picking fights with pimps or collecting court summonses with a shrug of the shoulders; but Stanly KV and Parashu ML have been raiding brothels and private homes to rescue girls, boys and women for the past 20 years. Sometimes with the aid of the police, sometimes in spite of the police, these two quiet men of Mysore have kicked in doors and traded blows with traffickers to help free more than 2,000 victims across southern India.

The pair run Odanadi – meaning “soul mate” – an organisation that provides refuge, counselling, education and rehabilitation for up to 85 victims of trafficking at a time. They have taken in scores of domestic slaves and bonded labourers. They’ve raided 60 brothels and secured the convictions of 137 sex traffickers.

Impressive figures. But then the problem is on a massive scale. The Indian government’s own figures put the amount of people in some way involved in human trafficking – the illegal trade in people for the purposes of slavery, commercial sexual exploitation or forced labour – at around 100 million. Of those, 1.2 million are children.

But this fight did not start as a crusade against seemingly insurmountable odds; instead, they were shamed into it.

In the late 1980s, the two young friends worked together as newspaper journalists so closely their byline read simply ‘Stanly Parashu’. It was while conducting interviews for a piece on Dalits – members of India’s strict hierarchical system born below even the lowest caste – that they were challenged by a woman in the street.

 

“Her name was Radhamma,” Stanly says. “She was a prostitute, lower in social standing than even Dalits.

“She asked us: ‘What do you do with the story of these poor people? You write about them, get yourselves a good name, but these people get nothing in return. They think you are a saviour but you don’t come back.’ That really pricked our egos,” says Stanly.

Stung by the criticism, the men turned their attention towards one of India’s greatest taboos – prostitution – starting with Radhamma herself.

“Radhamma had been a housewife,” Stanly says. “But her husband took her to Bombay and sold her to a brothel. When he returned home without her he explained to her family she had run off with another man. He then married his wife’s sister.”

After two years Radhamma managed to escape the brothel and return to her village, now with a child fathered by a client. But her family believed her husband’s story and she was cast out, ending up living on the street working as a prostitute, depending on 10 clients a day to earn enough money to live on and send her son to school.

 

Radhamma had been working the streets for 10 years when Stanly and Parashu met her.

“We wanted to help, to give her financial support, and look after the boy’s education,” says Stanly.

Although they gave her a little cash and arranged for local restaurants to feed her son, Nanjumda, Radhamma found resistance to her change in circumstances too much to bear.

“When we returned a fortnight later, we found her again on the street in the same filthy condition,” Stanly says. “She said: ‘You gave me money but money is not changing my life. No one is accepting me, people are bothering me, police are harassing me.’ ”

Prostitutes coming under the police spotlight are treated with little sympathy.

“Women were dragged by their hair; there were no policewomen in those days,” Parashu says. “The male officers would drag them to the police station half-nude. “No one would ask the authorities about this violation of their human rights. We told the police that these ladies are citizens, human beings. We asked them to treat them humanely.

“We started questioning this ill-treatment and dragged chairs into the offices for the women to sit on instead of being forced to stand in the corner of the police station,” says Parashu. “This started the gap to open between the police and us.” Next page

 

Ashtanga Blogs – Live from Mysore

’tis the season.

India Outside My Window
http://www.indiaoutsidemywindow.com/

The Unruly Ascetic
http://unrulyascetic.blogspot.com/

Livin Ashtanga Yoga
http://livin-ashtanga-yoga.blogspot.com/

Ashtanga and other things – Paul Gold’s Blog
http://paulmitchellgold.wordpress.com/

Yoga Mama
http://yogamamalondon.blogspot.com/

Yoga by Emma
http://emmaoneillyoga.blogspot.com/

Sadhana for One
http://thisismysadhana.wordpress.com/

Journey to Mysore
http://journeytomysore.wordpress.com/

Susananda
http://susananda.blogspot.com/

Marian Writes
http://marianwrites.wordpress.com/

voyages d’iles, voyage d’elle
http://voyagesdilesvoyagedelle.blogspot.com/

My Journey to Mysore, India
http://lornatobin.blogspot.com/

______________________________________________________

Ashtanga Yogini
http://www.ashtangayogini.blogspot.com/

Waking Up Slowly
http://audraduran.blogspot.com/

Inside Owl
http://www.insideowl.com/index.php

Kino Yoga Blog
http://kinoyoga.com/category/blog/

Ashley.Von.Arx.
http://ashleyvonarx.blogspot.com/

Spark’s Diaries
http://sparksdiaries.blogspot.com/

YogaMorgan
http://yogamorgan.wordpress.com/

Jangalikayamane
http://jangalikayamane.com/

Bird in the Tree
http://deborahcrooks.blogspot.com/

Open Your Feet
http://openyourfeet.tumblr.com/

Suzy’s Mysore Blog 2011-12
http://suzanneelsafty.com/

My Yoga Journey
http://deniseyogajourney.blogspot.com/

The Yogi Kitchen / Keen on Food
http://www.theyogikitchen.com/
http://www.keenonfood.com/

Magnolia’s Blog
http://blog.mysoresf.com/

Realizing Mysore
http://realizingmysore.blogspot.com/

Mysore 2011
http://mysore2011.wordpress.com/

Operation Shanti
http://operationshanti.blogspot.com/

Satya Dharma
http://satyayogastudio.com/Blog/Blog.html

Blue Lotus Ashtanga
http://bluelotusashtanga.blogspot.com/

The Journey of My Practice
http://globie.wordpress.com/

My Mid Life Crisis
http://lauramccormack.wordpress.com/

Opening Hidden Doors
http://www.openinghiddendoors.com/?page_id=386

Ashtanga Yoga Richmond
http://www.ashtangarichmond.blogspot.com/

Dirgha Kala
http://dirghakala.wordpress.com/

Ashtanga Yoga Mother Earth
http://earthyogi.blogspot.com/

Peace Love Yoga
http://peaceloveyoga.blogspot.com/view/classic

Yoga helps addicts, homeless find peace

via Ashtanga Yoga New York

link to video

The Largest School Lunch Program on Earth

From Religion and Ethics Weekly
September 16, 2011
Watch @PBS
Akshaya Patra

 

Yoga at NY Fashion Week

It isn’t behind the scenes.

More Yoga DIY: Make your own mat cleaner

It is shaucha time!

So by now your mat smells funny and you’re too lazy to bring it back home with you? Are you embarrased by the sour stench when the teacher comes to adjust you? Making your own mat cleaner is fun and really simple.

Many cold-pressed citrus oils have both antiseptic and fat dissolving properties

Many cold-pressed citrus oils have both antiseptic and fat dissolving properties

You will need the following:

– Sterilized water
– Essential oils
– A little spray bottle

You can play with it, but start adding just a few drops of the essential oils. Then test it and see how much of a scent you can take (and think of your fellow yoga mates… don’t go crazy on the oils).

The most important part is that you use essential oils with antibacterial/antiseptic properties, such as tea tree, cinnamon bark, clove, fennel, grapefruit, lemon, lime, thyme, oregano, pine, rosemary, etc. Once you find your favorite combination, fill the bottle, and whenever you spray your mat let it dry for a few minutes.

Western Yoga Guilt: Should I wear a mala?

Malas:  The New Yoga Status Symbol
via Yoga Modern by

Whether you’re male, or female fashion is a great way to express creativity, and personality on a daily basis.

While I love bringing a sense of style into my yoga practice, I am not so sure how I feel about bringing yoga into my style. 

I have noticed an increasing amount of individuals sporting malas through out studios and community events, and I wonder if they are being worn as a symbol of devotion or merely as a fashion statement.  While searching the yogasphere I came across a mock ad on Yoga Dawg that poked fun at how sacred objects are often commercialized and treated by “western yogis” as trendy accessories rather than worn for their intended spiritual purpose.

The YogaDawg Sadhu Fall Collection

Top to Bottom

Vedic Face Paint
Lotus Joy Premium Yoga Club
Mellow Yellow Chakra Yoga Shirt
Holy Moly Far Out Yoga Bead Set
Mellow Yellow Chakra Yoga Pants

While it is common in the Hindu religion to wear malas around the neck, it is typically used to practice devotion towards a deity. Malas are used to express one’s respect and service to that god, and it’s considered disrespectful to wear the beads flippantly or without intention. Devotees are expected to be disciplined in spiritual practices that are deserving of the malas and the blessings they come with.

For example, many people wear the rudraksha mala in observance of the Lord Shiva. Devotees take certain measures that show respect, including the use of rituals and prayers to purify the beads, and they remove the beads when consuming alcohol, attending a funeral, having sex, and for women during menstruation.

I know very few yogis in the United States who take the same precautions when adorning themselves with malas. Most of us aren’t even aware that such precautions exist. continue reading