Synesthesia: The taste of music

It is said about neonatal synesthesia that babies upto about four months of age experience sensory input in an undifferentiated way, like many other mammals. Research suggests that all neonates are synesthetic in early life, but most of us lose the ability as our brains mature.

Synesthesia seems also to be more common among autistic people, according to Iris Johansson, an autistic Swedish author who describes some episodes of synesthesia in her autobiography “A different Childhood”. Iris has been a family advisor for a long time, and she’s helped many parents with understanding their autistic children. She explains in her book how some autistic kids will seek to provoke certain reactions in others, as they may see bright colours irradiating from peoples bodies i e when someone gets upset.

The pineal gland, which according to yoga science is the master gland of the body and the physical location of the Ajna Chakra, seems to be responsible for the fact that a fetus can perceive light and dark even before they develope eyes.

So is it possible that babies, autistic people and synaesthetes share the capacity to see through their third eye? Would yogic science explain their experience as their Ajna chakra being activated in a way regular people can’t relate to?

Is then the purification through spiritual sadhana taking us back into a state of childhood innocence as the chakras awaken? Is it a natural part of the process, that sensory stimuli merge back into the Oneness (yoga?) where all senses exist together?

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2 responses to “Synesthesia: The taste of music

  1. fascinating! i’m curious if this can be learned. if we start to make an effort to meditate on sounds and our reactions to them…not sure what the point would be of course. just curious!

  2. Some psychedelics can induce synesthesia. I, uh, heard that from a friend. A book-“Psychedelic Drugs Reconsidered”.
    Seeing the wind is neat-o, by the way.

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