Monthly Archives: July 2010

Rearing to go! Big butts are summer 2010′s hottest trend

-read more on NYdailynews.com

Make way! Big bums are shaping up to be the summer of 2010′s hottest trend.

Serena Williams reveals that it took her years to accept her curvy backside, joining other full-figured celebrities embracing their broader bottoms this beach season.

Kim Kardashian says she finally appreciates her round rear. Madonna’s daughter Lourdes loves shorts that make your butt look big. And a new book celebrates bulging booties.





Not since Sir Mix-a-Lot’s 1992 hit “Baby Got Back” has so much praise been paid to the posterior.

Williams admits that it wasn’t until she turned 23 that she realized she’d never have the same shape as her sister Venus.

“I’m super-curvy,” the 28-year-old tennis titan says in the August issue of Harper’s Bazaar. “I have big boobs and this massive butt.

“Venus is tall and she’s like a model and she fits everything,” Williams adds. “I was growing up, wanting to be her, wanting to look like her, and I was always fitting in her clothes, but then one day I couldn’t. But it’s fine. Now I’m obviously good.”

These days, she’s proud of the bod that’s won her 27 Grand Slam titles. “Since I don’t look like every other girl, it takes a while to be okay with that,” Williams says. “But different is good.”

Read more on NYdailynews

Saraswathi in New York City 8-12 Sept 2010

K. Pattabhi Jois Ashtanga USA (KPJ USA) and Ashtanga Yoga New York (AYNY) are extremely happy to announce that Saraswathi Rangaswamy will be teaching one week of Ashtanga Yoga classes in New York City from September 8 – September 12, 2010. Please note that classes on 9/8 and 9/12 will be led classes, and the classes on 9/9, 9/10 and 9/11 will be Mysore style. Location TBA.

Additionally, September 11 is Saraswathi’s 69th birthday, and we will celebrate by throwing a birthday party for her at 7 pm, at AYNY, 430 Broome St., 2nd floor.

The daughter of the late Ashtanga Yoga master, Sri K. Patthabi Jois, Saraswathi began practicing yoga at the age of five. She was the first woman to teach coed yoga classes in Mysore, India, and she has been teaching yoga since 1967.


Another Portrait of Ashtanga Yoga

Ashtanga Yoga with Basia Lipska

Ashtanga TV

With Miami’s Kino MacGregor out of the running for Oprah’s “Your Own Show” contest, we look to Bali’s Anthony “Prem” Carlisi and Heather “Radha” Duplex on youtube

KPJAYI: new Jois Yoga Shala in Encinitas

Sharath, Saraswathi and Manju to teach in the new Jois Shala in Encinitas, California, from the 20th of August. From kpjayi.org:

Boys have penises and girls have vaginas

Scientists discover that men and women are kind of different sometimes.

New York Times June 30, 2010, 12:01 am

Phys Ed: What Exercise Science Doesn’t Know About Women

By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS
Several years ago, Dr. David Rowlands, a senior lecturer with the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health at Massey University in New Zealand, set out to study the role of protein in recovery from hard exercise. He asked a group of male cyclists to ride intensely until their legs were aching and virtually all of their stored muscle fuel had been depleted. The cyclists then consumed bars and drinks that contained either mostly carbohydrates or both carbohydrates and protein. Then, over the next few days, they completed two sessions of hard intervals. One took place the following morning; the next, two days later.
Dr. Rowlands found that the cyclists showed little benefit during the first interval session. But during the second, the men who ingested protein had an overall performance gain of more than 4 percent, compared with the men who took only carbohydrates, “which is huge, in competitive terms,” Dr. Rowlands says. Other researchers’ earlier studies produced similar results. Protein seems to aid in the uptake of carbohydrates from the blood; muscles pack in more fuel after exercise if those calories are accompanied by protein. The protein is also thought to aid in the repair of muscle damage after hard exercise. Dr. Rowlands’s work, which was published in 2008, was right in line with conventional wisdom.

Not so his latest follow-up study, which was published online in May in the journal Medicine and Science in Sport and Exercise and should raise eyebrows, especially lightly plucked ones. After his original work was completed, Dr. Rowlands says, “we received inquiries from female cyclists,” asking to be part of any further research. So, almost as an afterthought, Dr. Rowlands and his colleagues repeated the entire experiment with experienced female riders.

This time, though, the results were quite different.  read full story at NY Times.